Skeet

skeetfield

American Skeet is the standard variety most shot within Australia. This discipline is shot over a standardised eight (8) pad system, set between a High and Low traphouse. This semi-circular layout starts with number one (1) pad at the High House through to number seven (7) pad at the Low House. The number eight (8) pad is set midway between the flight line of the targets.

Skeet is shot in brackets of twenty-five (25) targets, but with a set program from pad to pad. Each competitor knows where the target will appear from, going to and what speed it will attain. The challenge is the constantly changing angles, with neither left or right handed shooters having the advantage at the end of the round.

Procedure:

With each competitor in a rotation starting at pad one (1) a single High followed by a single Low is shot at. To complete number one (1), a pair of targets are simultaneously released. Pad two (2) is shot in identical manner as was pad one (1). Pad three, four and five are completed by shooting at a single High and a single Low target from each. Pad six (6) is then taken by shooting a single High followed by a single Low. A pair released simultaneously are then taken to complete the pad shooting Low first. Pad seven (7) is shot in the identical manner as was Pad six (6). Pad eight (8) is a single High followed by a single Low target. At this point, if no targets have been lost, the number eight (8) Low is released to make up the bracket of twenty-five (25). If this is not so, then the first missed target is repeated as the twenty-fifth (25) target.
Unlike DTL, only one (1) competitor occupies the shooting pad at any one time, completes that sequence of targets and ensures the shotgun is unloaded before leaving the pad to allow the next squad member to compete. Skeet shooting is a constantly changing angle of targets, and the competitors ability to learn and maintain a smooth action is what makes this discipline challenging and exciting.